MISTAKE

MISTAKE

Written By : Bakhtiar Hakeem
This was his judgment on Compass (the direction to choose) and Clock, the timings. This is what made him Quaid-i-Azam. Only men of his stature could give a people a country to live in.
MISTAKE Wise people learn from the mistakes of others…, what an over simplification! Let us enjoy ‘Mistake’,a little before we ponder. Then I wish to take you to a peep into a new day, with a clearer picture of self vs. mistake and of the world around vs. mistake. Can we grow through Mistake? Yes, I believe so. Do you and I make mistakes? An obvious reply would be ‘Yes’. But we make this admission with a great deal of light heartedness. Fine, how many mistakes did you make yesterday? Who was the judge? What was, or is, the reference line or the code to testify? What did you do today, having known and learnt about the mistakes of yesterday? Gosh a long list of difficult questions! Soon we shall see much more through the kaleidoscope of Mistake. Many facets, colors and hues would be highlighted and shared. We will see lucky ones who make mistakes, and grow; and a majority of unlucky ones who feel ‘right’ almost always; whose judge is always their own self, their ‘conscience’. They almost always win all debating bouts. And when they lose others are foolhardy, myopic, adamant and stubborn. Please proceed to study and, I request you, to develop a pattern to shape a tentative hypothesis. This should finally take you to a brighter, healthier and a happier day; the day when you will not be repeating your yesterday. You were driving in busy streets of your city, with family and friends. And you bumped in to the bumper of car ahead of you…Oops. The sound of cracking glass told you something. Yes, the right hand side head-light was damaged, but hardly any sign on the Prado’s bumper. Bloody….eye-ball to eye-ball with the heavily -moutached, calm and rather smiling driver of Prado. You were protesting, why the hell he had to apply sudden brakes that too in the middle of the road. He walked back to his seat and was about to drive off. Seeing your red face and rising volume, he said,”Should I call the police?” And off he went and back you came to steering wheel. “Bhai you were too close to that jeep and were also holding your cell phone”, came a voice from rear seats. What was the mistake? Who was the judge? Will you learn? And what will you learn? Having driven down the right leg of a Y-Junction, on your way to Peshawar, you raised your eyes off glanced away from the newspaper and you realized you were on the wrong route. “OMG….this Highways Department has gone to dogs. They cannot display a sign board, I am already late by half-an-hour”. “Sir saray Pakistan ka yehi haal hai, (whole Pakistan is in the similar state”, said driver. Infact you had told your driver, to take up this road, since you had been along that route come many times before. Where is the mistake? Who made it? Who was the judge? Are you going to learn any thing before next trip or the next day, or would the driver be a shade better? You sent your eldest son, a bright student, to Dubai. It was for your and his (moneyed) future. He had just passed his matric in grade A and wanted to study, however. But you had an old wound inside to be healed and treated. You knew you were poor. And now was the time in the form of Jalil Hussain, you and your family all could become ameer (moneyed). It was time to take a radical turn. Within two years you, along with family became rich and was were on the route to be richer. The pride was growing, ego fattening and you could feel the ever increasing weight of your opinion and argument with friends and foe in the street. Third After two years, Jalil came, returned with still more Dirhams and Dinars, and you married him into the a family you had dreamt of. She was the daughter of Sh. Azeem, whose house you had built as a mason eight years ago. Within next three months, Jalil got his wife to Dubai and it implied closure of foreign-exchange tap. Months and quarters passed and you were fast hitting back descending to your nadir, the pauper state. Three daughters and a son were still to be married. And you were ‘poor’ again. Now you cry and curse Jalil, and add his mother also in your swears. Where was the mistake? Was it of compass or clock? Who is the judge? Who, if any one is going to learn out of from it? When and how many? These were the politically-hectic days of first six months of 1946. Cabinet Mission had given its recommendations. AIML had accepted it on June 8th, but “The British Government desired that while the constitution-making plan proceeds, an Interim Government, having the support of major political parties, may be formed at the centre. In consultation with the members at the Cabinet Mission, the Viceroy announced the formation of a 14-member Executive Council. The Quaid-i-Azam objected to it as the Interim Government had been formed without calling a list from the Muslim League. Moreover, parity between the Congress and the Muslim League, which had been agreed to at Simla, had been abandoned and a fourteenth member belonging to Parsi community had been included in the Interim Government. According to the Quaid-i-Azam, these modifications adversely affected the proportion of the Muslims in the Interim Government. The Quaid-i-Azam also objected to the inclusion of his name in the Interim-Government as he had made it clear to the Viceroy that as long as he was the President of the All-India Muslim League, he would not accept any office.” At one point of time, Mr. Jinnah told the Viceroy, I have to get back to Central Executive Body (of AIML). Lord Mountbatten, the representative of occupying monarchy and biggest colonial power, said,” Mr. Jinnah, You may not have your Pakistan”. Jinnah replied, “What has to be has to be”. This was his judgment on Compass (the direction to choose) and Clock, the timings. This is what made him Quaid-i-Azam. Only men of his stature could give a people a country to live in. Decades down the line, in 2001, an assistant secretary of state of a non-occupying but oppressive and aggressive country put across seven demands on to the ruler of the country won by Great Mr. Jinnah. This despotic ruler was, Chief of Army Staff, Chairman Joint Chief of Staff Committee, Chief Executive and President - all in one. This minuscule, cardboard leader, smaller than a tick and a mite surrendered to all, on telephone- what a judgment of compass and clock! Did he make a mistake? What was the mistake? Who is the judge? Has he learnt from it? Ah! He still calls himself a General. Has other contemporaries learnt from what he did? Mr. Boom Boom Afridi, famous or notorious, is nearing the end of his cricketing life, having been in and out recently. Watch his videos of last fifty matches (358 ODI and 48 Tests) and measure try to identify what mistakes does he make? Does he learn from his mistakes? Who is his judge? What has been his rate of growth? Last example. Jamila was a beautiful, healthy young girl; surrounded and protected by the best of three loving and caring references: mother, father and elder brother(Adda). She had little demands, very few questions and was an obedient and good follower. She passed her matric in second division and the whole house was full of jubilant.tions. By then she had also learnt to recite the Quran, to play ludo and another disc game. She could wash clothes like her mother did and help her in simple household chores, whenever asked. All what she did was excellent and superb. Adda was all honey and sugar for her. Never ever any of her three determinant perimeters of life pointed out any mistake in what she did. Seeing her flare flair for studies, she was put in college. It was a good ten km away. Her being an active college student was some thing above board for the family. Their total focus was her care, comfort and safe journey to and from the college. Two years passed and she finished faculty of arts failing in two subjects. It was an outstanding result for her family. They were simply exuberant and loaded her with tons of gifts, Adda leading. So that was the climax and end of her academic stint. By then she had learnt to cook two types of daal (pulses) curries, two types of mutton and beef dishes, and one type of halwa and one type of Kheer as well. Yes, spinach she had learnt by the age of twelve. She had also not worn any thing other than else but, shalwar qameez and dopatta so simple as that. How nice she was! She is now over fifty-five, amongst the wise, healthy and most contended people of the village. She is known by her innocent smile. Never She did not learn to cook any additional dish, any baking, stiching, biking, riding, driving, handling of microwave and even tuning of TV. Away She remained away and safe from any mistakes in up-hosltry, painting, planting, any handywork, lawn-care or plant, harvesting etc. She has yet to ever ask and know the difference amongst switch, socket and plug. Her cell phone is operated by her daughter, say once a week. Never she has never done any shopping without being accompanied by her husband or son. And never she has she visited any doctor or hospital without them. And to top it all, she has yet to board a train. Great she is, trouble free, mistake free! Today people of her village love her and call her Malka Allah Lok or Jantay (Queen, the God-chosen or God-loving). What kind of non-demanding, non-challenging, least-testing God is this! Does 3: 189-190, 45:12-13, 67:2, 76:2 describe and portray such an Allah What is the nature and chemistry of ‘mistake’? Do we need to study and understand it? How was this life time spent in making the transition from Jamila to Jantay? Who was or were the judge(s)? How did they fare? Is not making a mistake a potential blessing? Let me conclude. Fortunate and lucky ones make mistakes, and grow!